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Sustainable Water Resources in the Built Environment Sustainable Water Resources in the Built Environment PDF By author Marilyn Waite last download was at 2017-11-03 22:58:13. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Sustainable Water Resources in the Built Environment book. Sustainable Water Resources in the Built Environment covers elements of water engineering and policy making in the sustainable construction of buildings with a focus on case studies from Panama and Kenya. It provides comprehensive information based on case studies, experimental data, interviews, and in-depth research. The book focuses on the water aspects of sustainable construction in less economically developed environments. It covers the importance of sustainable construction in developing country contexts with particular reference to what is meant by the water and wastewater aspects of sustainable buildings, the layout, climate, and culture of sites, the water quality tests performed and results obtained, the design of rainwater harvesting systems and policy considerations.


The book is a useful resource for practitioners in the field working on the water aspects of sustainable construction (international aid agencies, engineering firms working in developing contexts, intergovernmental organizations and NGOs). It is also useful as a text for water and sanitation practices in developing countries.



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March 8, 2008 831.19 kB Sustainable Water Resources in the Built Environment0    0 1
Making Public Enterprises Work Making Public Enterprises Work PDF By author William T. Muhairwe last download was at 2018-08-29 34:36:39. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Making Public Enterprises Work book. Public enterprises remain the most dominant medium of service provision in both developing and developed countries. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the outcry about poor performance of public enterprises was overwhelming. Nobody at that time and even now has managed to design a `blue print' solution. And yet, the fact that service provision through public enterprises is here to stay is the blunt truth.


In Making Public Enterprises Work - From Despair to Promise: A Turn Around Account, Dr. William Muhairwe, the Managing Director of National Water and Sewerage Corporation of Uganda, discusses the approaches used to turnaround an under-performing state enterprise into a remarkable success story. Drawing on decades of experience, taming `struggling' institutions, Dr. Muhairwe enumerates practical steps taken to make a significant difference in service delivery, for the benefit of any form of enterprise. Combined with facts, simplicity and fun, this book presents a unique account of methods used for constructive engagement and dialogue with donors, government officials, workers, suppliers and, indeed, the public/customers. All chapters are interspersed with tested lessons that any enterprise can benchmark to address its service delivery challenges. It is a great handbook for those involved in re-engineering their businesses.



Making Public Enterprises Work contains unique home-grown turnaround reform steps that can help to revamp under-performing enterprises. It is the first book to demonstrate that performance contracts combined with incentives can work wonders in public enterprises. The book discusses how incentive rewards can spread to all levels of staff and encourage wholesome teamwork. It also looks at how enterprises can work without industrial unrest in very difficult conditions. In addition the book demonstrates how public enterprises that have been listed for privatisation can provide alternative restructuring steps.



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March 11, 2018 182.57 kB Making Public Enterprises Work1    0 4
PDF By author last download was at 2018-02-23 29:09:54. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online book.
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September 16, 2008 803.64 kB 3    0 4
Integrated Assessment for Water Framework Directive Implementation : Data, Economic and Human Dimension Integrated Assessment for Water Framework Directive Implementation : Data, Economic and Human Dimension PDF By author Peter A. Vanrolleghem last download was at 2018-01-05 42:14:14. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Integrated Assessment for Water Framework Directive Implementation : Data, Economic and Human Dimension book. Special Offer: Water Framework Directive Series Set


To buy all four titles including Volume 3 and save GBP100, visit: http://www.iwapublishing.com/books/9781780400013/water-framework-directive-series-set


Implementing the comprehensive Water Framework Directive requires a thorough planning process that consists of several consecutive steps. The least one can say is that it is a challenging task which needs appropriate ICT tools that are able to cope with the complexity of the water system and this planning process. Integrated assessment, participatory processes and the science-policy interface are one of the newer elements in this overall implementation process that have developed greatly thanks to the WFD. Economic methods, models and instruments are integrative to the WFD implementation as well, with such concepts as cost recovery of water resources being central to debate with stakeholders. Economic valuation of natural resources (willingness-to-pay, willingness-to-accept, ...) should get sufficient attention and the human dimension (perception, needs, wants, values and behaviours) should be incorporated in the modelling frameworks for decision-making. In the same line there is also a human dimension to the use of models: how do non-modellers, such as managers, policy-makers, other stakeholders feel about models and their use in their day-to-day activities. And finally, this volume deals with the large issue of data: its quality, availability and, not to forget, accessibility. And can we use data both for monitoring purposes (surveillance, operational and investigative in the WFD context) and for modelling. Is there a synergy to be found? These tasks, the underlying concepts, methods, tools and procedures are the subject of this volume.



The other three volumes in the Water Framework Directive Series are:


Water Framework Directive: Model supported Implementation - A Water Manager's Guide edited by Fred Hattermann and Zbigniew W Kundzewicz
Modelling Aspects of Water Framework Directive Implementation - Volume 1 edited by Prof. Peter A. Vanrolleghem
Decision Support for WFD implementation - Volume 3, edited by Peter A. Vanrolleghem



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June 4, 2016 21.83 MB Integrated Assessment for Water Framework Directive Implementation : Data, Economic and Human Dimension2    0 4
Decision Support for Water Framework Directive Implementation Decision Support for Water Framework Directive Implementation PDF By author Peter A. Vanrolleghem last download was at 2017-05-27 40:59:09. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Decision Support for Water Framework Directive Implementation book. Special Offer: Water Framework Directive Series Set Click here to buy all four titles including Volume 3 and Save GBP100!


Decision Support for Water Framework Directive Implementation: Volume 3 is a concrete outcome from the Harmoni-CA concerted action as part of a 4-volume series of Guidance Reports that guide water professionals through the implementation process of the Water Framework Directive, with a focus on the use of ICT-tools (and in particular modelling). They are complementary to the Guidance Documents produced by the EU Directorate General for Environment.



Water resources planning and management and the development of appropriate policies require methodologies and tools that are able to support systematic, integrative and multidisciplinary assessments at various scales. It also requires the quantification of various uncertainties in both data and models, and the incorporation of stakeholders participation and institutional mechanisms into the various tools and risk assessment methodologies, to help decision makers understand and evaluate alternative measures and decisions.



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The other three volumes in the Water Framework Directive Series are:


Water Framework Directive: Model supported Implementation - A Water Manager's Guide edited by Fred Hattermann and Zbigniew W Kundzewicz
Modelling Aspects of Water Framework Directive Implementation - Volume 1 edited by Prof. Peter A. Vanrolleghem
Integrated Assessment for WFD implementation: Data, economic and human dimension - Volume 2 edited by Peter A. Vanrolleghem

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May 23, 2007 34.23 MB Decision Support for Water Framework Directive Implementation1    0 2
Water Infrastructure for Sustainable Communities Water Infrastructure for Sustainable Communities PDF By author Vladimir Novotny last download was at 2017-11-20 55:30:12. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Water Infrastructure for Sustainable Communities book. A new model for water management is emerging worldwide in response to water shortages, polluted waterways, climate change, and loss of biodiversity. Cities and towns are questioning the ecological and financial sustainability of big-pipe water, stormwater, and sewer systems and are searching for "lighter footprint" more sustainable solutions. Pilot projects are being built that use, treat, store, and reuse water locally and that build distributed designs into restorative hydrology.


This book has been developed from the conference on Sustainable Water Infrastructure for Villages and Cities of the Future (SWIF2009) held in November 2009 in Beijing (China) that brought together an international gathering of experts in urban water and drainage infrastructure, landscape architecture, economics, environmental law, citizen participation, utility management, green building, and science and technology development.



Water Infrastructure for Sustainable Communities China and the World reveals how imaginative concepts are being developed and implemented to ensure that cities, towns, and villages and their water resources can become ecologically sustainable and provide clean water. With both urban and rural waters as a focal point, the links between water quality and hydrology, landscape, and the broader concepts of green cities/villages and smart development are explored. The book focuses on decentralized concepts of potable water, stormwater, and wastewater management that would provide clean water. It results in water management systems that would be resilient to extreme events such as excessive flows due to extreme meteorological events, severe droughts, and deteriorated water and urban ecosystem quality. A particular emphasis is placed on learning lessons from the many innovative projects being designed in China and other initiatives around the world.



The principal audience for the book is university faculty and students, scientists in research institutes, water professionals, governmental organizations, NGOs, urban landscape architects and planners.



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Edited by Professor Xiaodi Hao, Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture, P. R. of China, Professor Vladimir Novotny, Northeastern University, Boston, USA and Dr Valerie Nelson, Coalition for Alternative Wastewater Treatment, MA, USA

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August 18, 2011 267.82 kB Water Infrastructure for Sustainable Communities0    0 3
Governance and Complexity in Water Management Governance and Complexity in Water Management PDF By author Hans Bressers last download was at 2017-12-11 16:48:48. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Governance and Complexity in Water Management book. Careful reconsideration of strategies to achieve water management ambitions, together with a more in-depth knowledge of the theories and practices of boundary spanning, could bring solutions for contemporary water problems within reach. Governance and Complexity in Water Management incorporates conceptual, theoretical and practical foci on dealing with complexity and conflict by boundary spanning in adaptive water management. Guidance for boundary spanning in practice is presented, and important contemporary water management themes including flooding and flood policy, water depletion and water restoration are discussed in detail. This is the first book to describe, analyze and prescribe water transitions through a boundary perspective.

This book provides an unique combination of theory, application, and analysis. It will be a valuable book for water professionals, policy scientists, students, and scholars in natural resource management and especially water management.

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July 16, 1998 204.95 kB Governance and Complexity in Water Management5    0 1
Remaining Asset Life : A State of the Art Review Remaining Asset Life : A State of the Art Review PDF By author Anthony Urquhart last download was at 2017-06-01 27:40:18. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Remaining Asset Life : A State of the Art Review book. This report is an output of the fourth research track (Track 4) of WERF's strategic asset management research program `Asset Management Communication and Implementation' (SAM1R06). Track 4 addressed `remaining asset life', and had the overall objective of contributing to the development of techniques, tools and methods for estimating residual life of wastewater assets. Track 4 research was planned to be undertaken in a staged manner, so as to provide a stepwise development of concepts and protocols.


To this end, the research team has produced a synthesis of knowledge in relation to "end of life" and "remaining asset life", which is the subject of this report. Drawing on the literature and the knowledge-base of the research team and industry partners, information is presented on the range of factors that influence the life of the different asset classes involved in the provision of wastewater services. A taxonomy of asset life is also given, along with a critical review of the conceptual linkages between risk, asset management and remaining asset life. A review of techniques used to assess remaining asset life is also included, as well as a detailed `state of the art' review of modeling tools and approaches.



One of the key questions to be addressed in this initial stage of the research was the state of knowledge with respect to the estimation and prediction of remaining asset life, and if there is the capacity to translate between condition and performance data (e.g. the presence of significant defects) and the residual life of an asset. In this regard, this report builds on previous work undertaken by the research team into protocols for condition and performance assessments, as detailed in WERF (2007).

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May 12, 2017 17.61 MB Remaining Asset Life : A State of the Art Review4    0 3
Public Communication : Perceptions and Early Communications Tools Public Communication : Perceptions and Early Communications Tools PDF By author Linda Blankenship last download was at 2018-03-01 04:11:04. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Public Communication : Perceptions and Early Communications Tools book. Public understanding leading to support for investment in aging water infrastructure is absolutely essential in order to close the "gap" between projected and current funding levels. In response to the need identified by its utility members, the Water Environment Research Foundation has funded a research program on Strategic Asset Management program (SAM) for wastewater and water utilities.


One objective of the research program included the development of an effective communications package - aimed at public officials, policy makers, utility managers and rate payers - to encourage the adoption of SAM and provide guidance on its implementation in the utility environment. This report provides the initial results of the research program to understand elected and appointed officials' perspectives on the issue of asset management and infrastructure sustainability. It uses results of a survey, focus groups, interviews and a case study to understand how public support for infrastructure sustainability can be gained. Relevant and readily usable tools that focus on the infrastructure sustainability issue are identified. Messages that elected, appointed, and salaried public officials can use in communication with their stakeholders have been identified.

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April 10, 2009 49.93 kB Public Communication : Perceptions and Early Communications Tools3    0 5
Decision Analysis and Implementation Guidance in Strategic Asset Management Decision Analysis and Implementation Guidance in Strategic Asset Management PDF By author Duncan Rose last download was at 2018-05-04 56:35:03. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Decision Analysis and Implementation Guidance in Strategic Asset Management book. Track 3 of WERF's Strategic Asset Management Project was developed to "provide guidance on implementing SAM...and develop analytic tools for SAM implementation" - the Decision Support Tools and Implementation Guidance goal. In Track 3, the Decision Support Tools and Implementation Guidance goal was organized around two major elements: Analytic/Decision Support Tools - Develop staged, user-friendly analytic and decision support tools (gap analysis, cost benefit analysis, risk management, life cycle costing, condition assessment selection tool, etc.) for SAM implementation and continuous improvement. Implementation Tool - Provide practical, accessible guidance for an implementation tool to undertake SAM in incremental stages leading to a well-planned, structured, and progressive implementation to suit the needs of a diverse range of utilities' communication practices.


Task Order 2 provided for the following deliverables:

Set up Practitioner Tool-Review Working Group and Establish Framework
Catalogue Available "Commercial Off-The-Shelf" SAM tools
Identify and Prioritize Core Set of Tools
Identify Critical Success Factors for Implementing SAM Review and Modify the Gap Analysis Tool
Refine the "Six Alternative Routes to Implementation" Tool
Develop Information Requirements for SAM Decision Making



The materials presented in the following sections were developed as a result of executing Task Order 2 to achieve the Project goal. Each chapter details a separate deliverable. Relevant developed materials have been or are in the process of being added to SIMPLE, WERF's web-based asset management knowledge base. Asset management can be defined as a way of management thinking and a set of best practices built around a structured framework that assist asset managers in making the most cost effective investment decisions in existing and new assets to sustain long term performance of the assets in an environment of limited resources where these decisions represent an integration of operations, maintenance, and capital intervention strategies. At the heart of the framework is the concept of business risk - a metric that measures the interaction of the probability of failure, the consequence of failure, and risk mitigation strategies.



This research:

Facilitates the adoption of best practice in asset management in the public water utility industry
Provides an asset management knowledge base that is a structured repository of a broad range and deeply substantive collection of materials oriented toward the practicing asset manager
Addresses the why and how of asset management at levels for novice, intermediate, and advanced practitioners

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November 18, 1998 50.11 MB Decision Analysis and Implementation Guidance in Strategic Asset Management0    0 0
Predicting the Remaining Economic Life of Wastewater Pipes : PHASE I: DEVELOPMENT OF STANDARD DATA STRUCTURE TO SUPPORT WASTEWATER PIPE CONDITION AND PERFORMANCE PREDICTION Predicting the Remaining Economic Life of Wastewater Pipes : PHASE I: DEVELOPMENT OF STANDARD DATA STRUCTURE TO SUPPORT WASTEWATER PIPE CONDITION AND PERFORMANCE PREDICTION PDF By author Richard Thomasson last download was at 2017-01-28 35:41:37. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Predicting the Remaining Economic Life of Wastewater Pipes : PHASE I: DEVELOPMENT OF STANDARD DATA STRUCTURE TO SUPPORT WASTEWATER PIPE CONDITION AND PERFORMANCE PREDICTION book. Accurate prediction of wastewater pipe structural and functional deterioration plays an essential role in the utility asset management process and capital investment planning. The key to implementing an asset management strategy is a comprehensive understanding and prediction of asset condition and performance.


The primary objective of this research is therefore to develop protocols and methods for predicting the remaining economic life of wastewater pipe assets. The limits of deterioration prediction capabilities are not in mathematical models or statistical analysis methods, but in lack of accurate and consistent data. This report presented the short-term phase-1 which has been completed with results from intensive literature reviews, various interviews with utilities, and pipe associations. In this phase, the research team investigated the life cycle of wastewater pipeline and identified the causes of pipe failure in different phases including design, manufacture, construction, operation and maintenance, and repair/rehabilitation/replacement.



The research team has prepared various modes and mechanisms of pipe failure in wastewater infrastructure system as well as identified environmental and societal consequences of the failure. After reviewing all relevant reports and utility databases, the research team has developed a set of standard pipe parameter list (data structure) and pipe data collection methodology. The data structure has been classified into Gold, Silver, Bronze and Wood standard.

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November 8, 2001 982.26 kB Predicting the Remaining Economic Life of Wastewater Pipes : PHASE I: DEVELOPMENT OF STANDARD DATA STRUCTURE TO SUPPORT WASTEWATER PIPE CONDITION AND PERFORMANCE PREDICTION3    0 1
Evaluation of QSPR Techniques for Wastewater Treatment Processes Evaluation of QSPR Techniques for Wastewater Treatment Processes PDF By author Eric Dickenson last download was at 2017-02-13 23:04:59. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Evaluation of QSPR Techniques for Wastewater Treatment Processes book. Available as an eBook only.


Most households regularly use products containing trace organic compounds (TOrC), including endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), personal care products (PCPs), and household chemicals (HHCs), which ultimately end up in municipal wastewater treatment systems. These emerging TOrC are of concern due to the increasing number of reports of reproductive disorders in aquatic wildlife residing below wastewater outfalls and the continuous creation of new synthetic TOrCs, which precludes comprehensive testing for all potentially toxic compounds.


In order to assess the exposure of these compounds into the environment there is a need to evaluate their removal within conventional wastewater treatment systems. The near impossibility of experimentally studying the fate and transport of current and future emerging contaminants on an individual basis indicates a need to develop a tool which quickly provides guidance on how effectively certain compounds are removed during wastewater treatment. This tool would provide utilities the ability to quickly screen an organic compound of concern and provide a meaningful response in regards to exposure assessment. Quantitative structure property relationships (QSPRs) are useful and powerful tools for quickly screening the environmental fate of emerging contaminants and assessing their removal within treatment systems. However, an evaluation of existing QSPR models applicable for wastewater removal mechanisms is lacking.



The objective of this study was to evaluate existing QSPRs for predicting the partitioning of a TOrC between the aqueous and solids phases during primary and activated sludge treatments and the transformation rates of a TOrC during biological activated-sludge and chlorine oxidation treatments.

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May 25, 2001 59.33 MB Evaluation of QSPR Techniques for Wastewater Treatment Processes4    0 0
Overview of State Energy Reduction Programs and Guidelines for the Wastewater Sector Overview of State Energy Reduction Programs and Guidelines for the Wastewater Sector PDF By author Joseph Cantwell last download was at 2017-10-26 54:55:60. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Overview of State Energy Reduction Programs and Guidelines for the Wastewater Sector book. Approximately 35% of a wastewater treatment facilities' total cost to provide wastewater service is for energy use. Industry wide, about 0.6% of the electric energy produced in the United States is consumed by commercial sector wastewater treatment. Clearly, the wastewater sector and other wastewater treatment providers, such as industry and commercial establishments, need cost-effective solutions for energy management and efficiency in their wastewater treatment operations. The interrelated problems of rising energy costs and demand alongside climate change have brought the issue of energy efficiency into the forefront of most every wastewater treatment provider today. The Operations Optimization Challenge is the Water Environment Research Foundation's (WERF) program to build integrated, comprehensive, long-term research into process optimization, energy efficiency, energy and resource recovery, and minimization of the environmental footprint of wastewater collections and treatment.


The primary goal of the Optimization Challenge is to develop approaches that allow the wastewater sector to attain a 20% or greater reduction in energy to achieve treatment goals. One of the goals of the Operations Optimization Challenge is to identify the approaches used by the most effective power utility or state energy efficiency programs. Using these most effective elements of these programs build upon success and promote energy efficiency at the facility by putting in place the framework for effective energy management at a higher level. Currently only four states have effective energy reduction programs with a long-term history of performance. This report is aimed at increasing the number of states or other agencies (interstate agencies as well as power providers) who can implement successful programs to assist the wastewater sector reduce nationwide energy demand.



In support of this goal, this report:


Provides suggested language for incorporating energy efficiency related concepts in design guidelines or standards.
Evaluates the feasibility of establishing a national design standard for wastewater treatment facilities which incorporates energy efficiency related concepts in an outlined model standard. This includes results from a technical working session of selected wastewater regulatory and energy regulatory agencies that was focused on the issue of incorporating energy guidelines in their respective standards.
Identifies reviews and analyzes successful state and utility sponsored wastewater-related energy programs and suggests a model framework based on the key elements of these programs.

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September 19, 1997 68.97 kB Overview of State Energy Reduction Programs and Guidelines for the Wastewater Sector5    0 4
Development of a Microbial Fuel Cell for Sustainable Wastewater Treatment Development of a Microbial Fuel Cell for Sustainable Wastewater Treatment PDF By author MIchael Ellis last download was at 2018-02-08 34:23:48. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Development of a Microbial Fuel Cell for Sustainable Wastewater Treatment book. Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process that removes contaminants and protects the environment. While some wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) recover a small portion of their energy demand through sludge handling processes, most of the useful energy available from wastewater remains unrecovered. Efforts are underway to harness energy from wastewater by developing microbial fuel cells (MiFCs) that generate electricity.

Key challenges to the development of microbial fuel cells include inefficiencies inherent in recovering energy from microbial metabolism (particularly carbon metabolism) and ineffective electron transfer processes between the bacteria and the anode. We explored the prospects for constructing microaerobic nitrifying MiFCs which could exhibit key advantages over carbon-based metabolism in particular applications (e.g., potential use in ammonia-rich recycle streams). In addition, we evaluated nanostructure-enhanced anodes which have the potential to facilitate more efficient electron transfer for MiFCs because carbon nanostructures, such as nanofibers, possess outstanding conducting properties and increase the available surface area for cellular attachment.



In the initial phase of this project, we investigated the performance of a novel nitrifying MiFC that contains a nanostructure-enhanced anode and that demonstrated power generation during preliminary batch testing. Subsequent batch runs were performed with pure cultures of Nitrosomonas europaea which demonstrated very low power generation. After validating our fuel cell hardware using abiotic experiments, we proceeded to test the MiFC using a mixed culture from a local wastewater treatment plant, which was enriched for nitrifying bacteria. Again, the power generation was very low though noticeably higher on the nanostructured anodes.



After establishing and monitoring the growth of another enriched nitrifying culture, we repeated the experiment a third time, again observing very low power generation. In the absence of appreciable and repeatable power production from pure and mixed nitrifying cultures, we focused on the second major objective of the work which was the fabrication and characterization of carbon nanostructured anodes. The second research objective evaluated whether or not addition of carbon nanostructures to stainless steel anodes in anaerobic microbial fuel cells enhanced electricity generation.



The results from the studies focused on this element were very promising and demonstrated that CNS-coated anodes produced up to two orders of magnitude more power in anaerobic microbial fuel cells than in MiFCs with uncoated stainless steel anodes. The largest power density achieved in this study was 506 mW m-2, and the average maximum power density of the CNS-enhanced MiFCs using anaerobic sludge was 300 mW m-2. In comparison, the average maximum power density of the MiFCs with uncoated anodes in the same experiments was only 13.7 mW m-2, an almost 22-fold reduction. Electron microscopy showed that microorganisms were affiliated with the CNS-coated anodes to a much greater degree than the noncoated anodes. Sodium azide inhibition studies showed that active microorganisms were required to achieve enhanced power generation.



The current was reduced significantly in MiFCs receiving the inhibitor compared to MiFCs that did not receive the inhibitor. The nature of the microbial-nanostructure relationship that caused enhanced current was not determined during this study but deserves further evaluation. These results are promising and suggest that CNS-enhanced anodes, when coupled with more efficient MiFC designs than were used in this research, may enhance the possibility that MiFC technologies can move to commercial application.

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January 20, 2013 92.18 MB Development of a Microbial Fuel Cell for Sustainable Wastewater Treatment0    0 5
Best Practices for Sustainable Wastewater Treatment : Initial Case Study Incorporating European Experience and Evaluation Tool Concept Best Practices for Sustainable Wastewater Treatment : Initial Case Study Incorporating European Experience and Evaluation Tool Concept PDF By author George V. Crawford last download was at 2017-04-24 44:40:30. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Best Practices for Sustainable Wastewater Treatment : Initial Case Study Incorporating European Experience and Evaluation Tool Concept book. The primary goal of the Optimization Challenge is to develop an approach that will allow the wastewater sector to achieve treatment goals while reducing the resources expended by 20% or more. The greater energy and chemical demands of facilities that provide nutrient removal make them a particularly challenging target, yet one with a significant potential return.

This report has three objectives: To evaluate the European Experience with energy reduction and best practices at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs)To evaluate the best practices employed at a European WWTP exhibiting significant energy reductions and energy managementTo develop a viable template for a mass and energy balance model to be used as the basis for a subscriber-accessible tool that will be developed later

The project team considered European facilities that have a history of process optimization and could serve as examples of best practices for the industry. One of these is the Strass im Zillertal WWTP near Innsbruck, Austria, a municipal facility that provides for both nitrogen and phosphorus removal. A lengthy optimization process spanning more than a decade has enabled the Strass plant to attain the singular goal of producing more electricity on an annual basis than it consumes. Factors specific to the plant contributed to the Strass WWTP's transformation into a net electricity producer, including the facility's need for only low level (5 meter static head) influent pumping. However, the bulk of the energy and process optimization resulted from a combination of national programs, concerted efforts by a highly-educated operations team, and an energy-conscious mindset. WERF and its subscribers can readily apply these success factors to North American facilities.


This study examined the context, drivers, and decisions behind the Strass WWTP enhancements toward energy self-sufficiency. These included: Examining regional and national energy and resource conservation programs that target wastewater treatment facilities in Scandinavia, Holland, Germany, Switzerland, and Austria Assessing Energy Conservation manuals used to promote resource conservation in European WWTPsDefining metrics applicable to WWTP operations optimizationEvaluating Strass WWTP performance, including interviews with the plant operations staffFormalizing and extending the approaches used by the Strass team to quantify and evaluate the sustainability of treatment plant operations, and developing an approach to adapt them to the North American reality.

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June 16, 2016 313.75 kB Best Practices for Sustainable Wastewater Treatment : Initial Case Study Incorporating European Experience and Evaluation Tool Concept5    0 1
Strategic Asset Management and Communication : Gaining Public Support - Experience with Citizen Advisory Committees Strategic Asset Management and Communication : Gaining Public Support - Experience with Citizen Advisory Committees PDF By author Linda Blankenship last download was at 2018-08-17 48:58:26. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Strategic Asset Management and Communication : Gaining Public Support - Experience with Citizen Advisory Committees book. Public understanding leading to support for investment in aging water infrastructure is absolutely essential in order to close the "gap" between projected and current funding levels. In response to the need identified by its utility members, the Water Environment Research Foundation has funded a research program on Strategic Asset Management (SAM) Implementation and Communication for wastewater and water utilities.


One objective of the research program included understanding the experience of utilities with citizen advisory committees to gain support for issues related to infrastructure sustainability and asset management. A variety of experiences are documented in this report. Lessons learned that can guide a utility that desires to establish a citizen advisory committee are identified in the areas of formation, logistics, goals and expected results.

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July 3, 2008 57.77 MB Strategic Asset Management and Communication : Gaining Public Support - Experience with Citizen Advisory Committees0    0 5
Sustainable Water for the Future Sustainable Water for the Future PDF By author Isabel C. Escobar last download was at 2018-07-21 30:02:49. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Sustainable Water for the Future book. This book is part of a series on sustainability. Specifically, it deals with the issue of sustainable water use. Fresh sources of potable water are being depleted across the world. Pure water is the goal of water utilities as well as several industries. Well past the experimental stage, membrane processes are now a proven and reliable method of providing high-quality, cost-effective water. Membrane technologies have immediate applications to treatment of fresh, brackish and sea waters, as well as wastewater reclamation. With innovative module design and engineering, micro- and ultra-filtrations have become effective and economical for drinking water production, particularly for removal of microorganisms. Membrane bioreactors are being developed for municipal and industrial water recycling. Various membrane processes are also used to remove contaminants from industrial wastewaters.

This book covers the fundamental and practical concepts and issues regarding the application of membrane technologies for sustainable water treatment. It describes and compares the effectiveness of desalination versus water recycling for long-term sustainable water use. This book is suitable for graduate and advanced undergraduate students, academic researchers and post-docs, manufacturers, consultants, design engineers and buyers in the field of Environmental Engineering and Chemical Engineering.

This title is Co-Published with Elsevier.

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June 26, 2007 139.28 kB Sustainable Water for the Future5    0 4
Regulation of Water and Wastewater Services Regulation of Water and Wastewater Services PDF By author Rui Cunha Marques last download was at 2018-07-26 04:35:47. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Regulation of Water and Wastewater Services book. This book, published in collaboration with ERSAR, presents a unique account of governance and regulatory methods used by different countries, states and municipalities that will help regulators and governments all over the world to improve their regulatory approaches. It is the first book to compile such an amount of data about regulatory processes of a wide number of countries from the five continents.


It discusses how the characteristics of water and wastewater services call for regulation and how different countries apply distinct regulatory methods. By showing 18 country case-studies, the book offers an interesting perspective as the regulatory models adopted vary immensely depending on geographical location, nature and strength of institutions and governments, political ideology, features and level of development of the countries. In addition, it provides examples of best practices that may be important for policy-makers to enhance the regulatory processes adopted in each country. It looks closely at rules imposed by state and local governments concerning regulatory issues and how they are being applied.


Regulation of Water and Wastewater Services covers the fundamental and practical concepts and issues regarding the regulation of water and wastewater services. It describes and compares the regulatory methods adopted in several countries and provides a global overview on regulation. There is detailed coverage of topics such as quality of service regulation, economic regulation and public service obligations. This book is suitable for regulators, academic researchers and students, consultants, operators and managers, policy-makers and other stakeholders.



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Author: Rui Cunha Marques, Center of Urban and Regional Systems (CESUR), Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon in collaboration with the Portuguese Water and Waste Services Regulation Authority (ERSAR)

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April 22, 2003 773.84 kB Regulation of Water and Wastewater Services0    0 4
Biological Wastewater Treatment Biological Wastewater Treatment PDF By author Glen T. Daigger last download was at 2017-08-09 52:25:25. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Biological Wastewater Treatment book. Written by experts in the field, the thoroughly updated 3rd Edition of Biological Wastewater Treatment covers commonly used and emerging suspended and attached growth reactors. Drawing on their extensive academic and industrial experience, the authors discuss combined carbon and ammonia oxidation, activated sludge, biological nutrient removal, aerobic digestion, anaerobic processes, lagoons, trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized beds, and biologically aerated filters to provide a comprehensive understanding of the field of biological wastewater treatment. They integrate the principles of biochemical processes with applications in the real world, communicating approaches to the conception, design, operation, and optimization of biochemical unit operations in a comprehensive yet lucid manner. Imparts a theoretical and quantitative understanding of biochemical operations, specifically the kinetics and stoichiometry of major reactions Employs mathematical models, such as the IWA/IAWQ Activated Sludge Models and biofilm modeling, to illustrate how bioreactor configuration affects performance in suspended and attached growth systems Presents biochemical operations as integrated systems in which carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification, and phosphorus removal are potential reactions and parallel events, emphasizing the engineer's role in determining which events dominate Furnishes process descriptions as well as details affecting the design, operation, and performance of suspended and attached growth bioreactors in a step-by-step fashion while employing practical constraints to ensure system viability in the real world Reveals the future of bioreactors in the removal of xenobiotic organic chemicals from wastewater Click here to read and share material related to this title on the IWA WaterWiki. Authors C. P. Leslie Grady, Jr., Clemson University, South Carolina, USA; Glen T. Daigger, CH2M Hill, Englewood, Colorado, USA; Nancy G. Love, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA; Carlos D. M. Filipe, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Contents INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND. Classification of Biochemical Operations. Fundamentals of Biochemical Operations. Stoichiometry and Kinetics of Biochemical Operations. THEORY: MODELING OF IDEAL SUSPENDED GROWTH REACTORS. Modeling Suspended Growth Systems. Aerobic Growth of Heterotrophs in a Single CSTR Receiving Soluble Substrate. Multiple Microbial Activities in Single CSTR. Multiple Microbial Activities in Complex Systems. Anaerobic Systems for Acidogenesis and Methanogenesis. Techniques for Evaluating Kinetic and Stoichiometry Parameters. Applications: SUSPENDED GROWTH REACTORS. Design and Evaluation of Suspended Growth Processes. Activated Sludge. Biological Nutrient Removal. Aerobic Digestion. Suspended Growth Anaerobic Processes. Lagoons. THEORY: MODELING OF IDEAL ATTACHED GROWTH REACTORS. Biofilm Modeling. Aerobic Growth of Biomass in Packed Towers. Aerobic Growth of Heterotrophs in Rotating Disc Reactors. Fluidized Bed Biological Reactors. APPLICATIONS: ATTACHED GROWTH REACTORS. Trickling Filter. Rotating Biological Contactor. Submerged Attached Growth Bioreactors. FUTURE CHALLENGES. Fate and Effects of Xenobiotic Organic Chemicals. Biological Wastewater Treatment: Third Edition is co-published with CRC Press

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September 1, 2014 28.51 MB Biological Wastewater Treatment2    0 1
Innovative and Integrated Technologies for the Treatment of Industrial Wastewater Innovative and Integrated Technologies for the Treatment of Industrial Wastewater PDF By author Antonio Lopez last download was at 2017-12-16 27:15:27. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Innovative and Integrated Technologies for the Treatment of Industrial Wastewater book. Innovative and Integrated Technologies for the Treatment of Industrial Wastewater deals with advanced technological solutions for the treatment of industrial wastewater such as aerobic granular biomass based systems, advanced oxidation processes integrated with biological treatments, membrane contactors and membrane chemical reactors. Wastewater from pharmaceutical, chemical and food industries as well as landfill leachates are specifically considered as representative of major problems encountered when treating industrial streams. The economic and environmental sustainability of the above solutions are also reported in the book and compared with the alternatives currently available in the market by life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC) methodologies. The implementation of the considered solutions at large scale could support and enhance the competitiveness of different industrial sectors, including the water technology sector, in the global market.


Innovative and Integrated Technologies for the Treatment of Industrial Wastewater also makes a contribution towards defining: new concepts, processes and technologies in wastewater treatment with potential benefits for the stable quality of effluents, energy and operational costs saving, and the protection of the environment new sets of advanced standards for wastewater treatment new methodologies for the definition of wastewater treatment needs and framework conditions new information supporting development and implementation of water legislation.

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December 25, 2001 296.9 kB Innovative and Integrated Technologies for the Treatment of Industrial Wastewater0    0 5
Water Reclamation Technologies for Safe Managed Aquifer Recharge Water Reclamation Technologies for Safe Managed Aquifer Recharge PDF By author Peter Dillon last download was at 2018-04-06 38:15:18. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Water Reclamation Technologies for Safe Managed Aquifer Recharge book. Part of Groundwater Set - Buy all six books and save over 30% on buying separately!


Water Reclamation Technologies for Safe Managed Aquifer Recharge has been developed from the RECLAIM WATER project supported by the European Commission under Thematic Priority 'Global Change and Ecosystems' of the Sixth Framework Programme. Its strategic objective is to develop hazard mitigation technologies for water reclamation providing safe and cost effective routes for managed aquifer recharge.



Different treatment applications in terms of behaviour of key microbial and chemical contaminants are assessed. Engineered as well as natural treatment trains are investigated to provide guidance for sustainable MAR schemes using alternative sources such as effluent and stormwater. The technologies considered are also well suited to the needs of developing countries, which have a growing need of supplementation of freshwater resources. A broad range of international full-scale case studies enables insights into long-term system behaviour, operational aspects, and fate of a comprehensive number of compounds and contaminants, especially organic micropollutants and bulk organics.



Water Reclamation Technologies for Safe Managed Aquifer Recharge depicts advances in water reclamation technologies and aims to provide new process combinations to treat alternative water sources to appropriate water quality levels for sustainable aquifer recharge.



Editors: Christian Kazner, RWTH Aachen University, Germany, Thomas Wintgens, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Peter Dillon, CSIRO, Australia

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October 17, 2004 95.65 MB Water Reclamation Technologies for Safe Managed Aquifer Recharge2    0 2
Reduction, Modification and Valorisation of Sludge Reduction, Modification and Valorisation of Sludge PDF By author Azael Fabregat last download was at 2017-03-12 21:44:52. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Reduction, Modification and Valorisation of Sludge book. The adoption of the Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive requires sewage sludge to be subsequently treated and the Sewage Sludge Directive regulates the uses and properties of stabilised sludge for being either recycled or disposed. Both directives drive specific actions in two complementary ways. Reduction, Modification and Valorisation of Sludge aims at developing strategies for the disposal and reuse of waste sludge. It aims to develop several processes for reducing both amount and toxicity of sludge, with simultaneous transformation into green energy vectors such as methane or hydrogen. Mesophilic and mainly thermophilic and autothermophilic conditions are explored as classical alternatives for sludge stabilisation, assuring sanitary conditions of the treated sludge. Valuable materials are obtained from sludge, such as activated carbons, which are used in conventional adsorption processes and in innovative advanced oxidation processes. Guidelines are provided for technology selection in agreement with the geographic, economic and technical characteristics of the sewage plants, demonstration of the feasibility of new applications for the sewage sludge, manufacturing of activated carbon from sludge sewage as innovative recycling of sludge waste, and a deep understanding of the methods involved.


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August 12, 2011 844.21 kB Reduction, Modification and Valorisation of Sludge3    0 0
Governance and Management for Sustainable Water Systems Governance and Management for Sustainable Water Systems PDF By author Neil S. Grigg last download was at 2018-06-05 58:50:15. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Governance and Management for Sustainable Water Systems book. Increasing global pressure on water resources requires many actions from governments and individuals to achieve sustainable levels of water use. These involve management tasks such as project development and utility operation, but the degree of interdependence among the many participants in water management is so great that additional regulatory and coordination mechanisms are needed to control water development and uses.


This book is designed to be the introductory work in the new Governance and Management for Sustainable Water Systems Series. It introduces the subject of governance of water systems and illuminates relatively unexplored topics of water resources management.The material is practical but advanced in the sense that theories of industry organization, governance, and institutional analysis are applied in new ways.



New case study applications are provided in the book and help the reader to understand how their disciplines apply to water management. The case studies are drawn from each sector and region in the world, including cases from the U.S.A., Europe, the Middle East, South America and a global case to cover water system privatization.



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Author: Professor Neil S Grigg, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University, USA

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November 8, 2014 67.2 MB Governance and Management for Sustainable Water Systems1    0 5
Desalination Technology Desalination Technology PDF By author Joseph Cotruvo last download was at 2017-09-15 16:21:53. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Desalination Technology book. Desalination Technology: Health and Environmental Impacts covers the latest developments in desalination, examining the environmental and public health-related impacts of these technologies. Written by international experts, the text presents specifications for assessing water quality, technical issues associated with desalination technologies, and the chemical aspects of desalinated water and its microbiology.

The book also discusses environmental protection issues that assist in the optimization of proposed and existing desalination facilities to ensure that nations and consumers enjoy the benefits of the expanded access to desalinated water. This includes coverage of health and environmental issues such as energy conservation and sustainability as well as protection of delicate coastal ecosystems and groundwater from contamination by surface disposal of concentrates - challenges that must be addressed during the design, construction, and operation of a desalination facility. Development of new and improved desalinization technologies, including major cost reduction trends, have significantly broadened the opportunities to access large quantities of safe water in many parts of the world.


And while there are many books available on desalination, this book's unusual approach blends technical coverage of the latest technologies with coverage of the environmental and public health-related impacts of these technologies, setting it apart from other resources. It provides technical guidance based on the practical expertise of a balanced group of international scientists and engineers.


Desalination Technology Health and Environmental Impacts:
Reviews the issues associated with the use of desalinated water, including the technological and management approaches, water quality issues, and health and environmental topics Analyzes the major aspects of desalination technology, engineering, and chemistry, identifying process-related mechanisms that may bring about departures from desired drinking water quality goals Covers the chemicals present in raw source water or introduced during the various stages of producing drinking water Discusses the monitoring requirements to demonstrate that water safety plans are appropriately designed, function effectively, and produce water that is safe to drink Introduces the concept, methodology, and practice of environmental impact assessment (EIA) for desalination projects with a proposed 10-step EIA approach

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Co-published with CRC Press

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January 8, 2011 105.3 kB Desalination Technology4    0 4
Source Separation and Decentralization for Wastewater Management Source Separation and Decentralization for Wastewater Management PDF By author Tove A. Larsen last download was at 2018-04-27 44:40:23. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Source Separation and Decentralization for Wastewater Management book. Is sewer-based wastewater treatment really the optimal technical solution in urban water management? This paradigm is increasingly being questioned. Growing water scarcity and the insight that water will be an important limiting factor for the quality of urban life are main drivers for new approaches in wastewater management.


Source Separation and Decentralization for Wastewater Management sets up a comprehensive view of the resources involved in urban water management. It explores the potential of source separation and decentralization to provide viable alternatives to sewer-based urban water management. During the 1990s, several research groups started working on source-separating technologies for wastewater treatment. Source separation was not new, but had only been propagated as a cheap and environmentally friendly technology for the poor. The novelty was the discussion whether source separation could be a sustainable alternative to existing end-of-pipe systems, even in urban areas and industrialized countries. Since then, sustainable resource management and many different source-separating technologies have been investigated. The theoretical framework and also possible technologies have now developed to a more mature state. At the same time, many interesting technologies to process combined or concentrated wastewaters have evolved, which are equally suited for the treatment of source-separated domestic wastewater.



The book presents a comprehensive view of the state of the art of source separation and decentralization. It discusses the technical possibilities and practical experience with source separation in different countries around the world. The area is in rapid development, but many of the fundamental insights presented in this book will stay valid. Source Separation and Decentralization for Wastewater Management is intended for all professionals and researchers interested in wastewater management, whether or not they are familiar with source separation.



Editors: Tove A. Larsen, Kai M. Udert and Judit Lienert, Eawag - Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Switzerland.



Contributors: Yuval Alfiya, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Prof. Dr. M. Bruce Beck, University of Georgia, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources; Dr. Christian Binz, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Innovation Research in Utility Sectors (Cirus); Prof. em. Dr. Markus Boller, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Urban Water Management (SWW); Prof. Dr. Eran Friedler, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Zenah Bradford-Hartke, The University of New South Wales, School of Chemical Engineering and UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology; Dr. Shelley Brown-Malker, Very Small Particle Company Ltd; Bert Bundervoet, Ghent University, Laboratory Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET); Prof. Dr. David Butler, University of Exeter, Centre for Water Systems; Dr. Christopher A. Buzie, Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Wastewater Management and Water Protection; Dr. Dana Cordell, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF); Dr. Vasileios Diamantis, Democritus University of Thrace, Department of Environmental Engineering; Prof. Dr. Jan Willem Erisman, Louis Bolk Institute; VU University Amsterdam, Department of Earth Sciences; Barbara Evans, University of Leeds, School of Civil Engineering; Prof. Dr. Malin Falkenmark, Stockholm International Water Institute; Dr. Ted Gardner, Central Queensland University, Institute for Resource Industries and Sustainability; Dr. Heiko Gebauer, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Innovation Research in Utility Sectors (Cirus); Prof. em. Dr. Willi Gujer, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETHZ), Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering (BAUG); Prof. Dr. Bruce Jefferson, Cranfield University, Cranfield Water Science Institute; Prof. Dr. Paul Jeffrey, Cranfield University, Cranfield Water Science Institute; Sarina Jenni, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Process Engineering Department (Eng); Prof. Dr. Hakan Joensson, SLU - Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Energy and Technology; Prof. Dr. Isik Kabdasli, Istanbul Technical University, Civil Engineering Faculty; Prof. Dr. Joerg Keller, The University of Queensland, Advanced Water Management Centre (AWMC); Prof. Dr. Klaus Koemmerer, Leuphana Universitat Luneburg, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry; Dr. Katarzyna Kujawa-Roeleveld, Wageningen University, Agrotechnology and Food Sciences Group; Dr. Tove A. Larsen, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Urban Water Management (SWW); Michele Laureni, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Process Engineering Department (Eng); Prof. Dr. Gregory Leslie, The University of New South Wales, School of Chemical Engineering and UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology; Dr. Harold Leverenz, University of California at Davis, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Dr. Judit Lienert, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Social Sciences (ESS); Prof. Dr. Jurg Londong, Bauhaus-Universitat Weimar, Department of Urban Water Management and Sanitation; Dr. Christoph Luthi, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec); Prof. Dr. Max Maurer, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Urban Water Management (SWW); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETHZ), Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering; Prof. em. Dr. Gustaf Olsson, Lund University, Department of Measurement Technology and Industrial Electrical Engineering (MIE); Prof. Dr. Ralf Otterpohl, Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Wastewater Management and Water Protection; Dr. Bert Palsma, STOWA, Dutch Foundation for Applied Water Research; Dr. Arne R. Panesar, Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH; Prof. Dr. Bruce E. Rittmann, Arizona State University, Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology; Prof. Dr. Hansruedi Siegrist, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Process Engineering Department (Eng); Dr. Ashok Sharma, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia, Land and Water Division; Prof. Dr. Thor Axel Stenstroem, Stockholm Environment Institute, Bioresources Group; Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Mathematical Science and Technology; Dr. Eckhard Stoermer, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Innovation Research in Utility Sectors (Cirus); Bjartur Swart, STOWA, Dutch Foundation for Applied Water Research; MWH North Europe; Prof. em. Dr. George Tchobanoglous, University of California at Davis, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Elizabeth Tilley, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETHZ), Centre for Development and Cooperation (NADEL); Prof. Dr. Bernhard Truffer, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology; Innovation Research in Utility Sectors (Cirus); Prof. Dr. Olcay Tunay, Istanbul Technical University, Civil Engineering Faculty; Dr. Kai M. Udert, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Process Engineering Department (Eng); Prof. em. Dr. Willy Verstraete, Ghent University, Laboratory Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET); Prof. Dr. Bjoern Vinneras, SLU - Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Energy and Technology; Prof. Dr. Urs von Gunten, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water Resources and Drinking Water (W+T); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL),School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENAC); Prof. em. Dr. Peter A. Wilderer, Technische Universitat Munchen, Institute for Advanced Study; Prof. Dr. Jun Xia, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Center for Water Resources Research and Key Laboratory of Water Cycle and Related Surface Processes; Prof. Dr. Grietje Zeeman, Wageningen University, Agrotechnology and Food Sciences Group

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December 10, 2014 147.96 kB Source Separation and Decentralization for Wastewater Management1    0 5
Communication Principles and Practices, Public Perception and Message Effectiveness Communication Principles and Practices, Public Perception and Message Effectiveness PDF By author Rula A. Deeb last download was at 2017-02-20 54:07:60. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Communication Principles and Practices, Public Perception and Message Effectiveness book. This project provides WERF subscribers with a state-of-knowledge report that is a synthesis of existing work and provides guidance on effective risk communication practices, public perception and message effectiveness.


Communication principles are applicable to a wide variety of potential health and environmental risks; however, the report is written with a focus on trace organic compounds. Project findings are drawn from: 1) a focused literature review of communication materials published in the environmental industry; 2) documents describing risk communication practices in other industries (nuclear energy, chemical manufacturing and the pharmaceutical industry) which culminated in several "lessons learned" that are relevant to trace organic compounds; 3) coding and systematic analysis of approximately 25 recent media articles pertaining to trace organic compounds focused on vocabulary and imagery, key messages, and the articles' likely impact on the public; and 4) interviews with water and wastewater utility representatives to better understand their existing communication and outreach programs, interaction with the public and media and perspectives on communications needs.



Principles described in this report can be used to convey a wide variety of messages to help municipalities better communicate with the media and public. Recommendations for utilities and ideas for future research specific to trace organic compounds are also provided.

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October 25, 2014 687.30 kB Communication Principles and Practices, Public Perception and Message Effectiveness4    0 0
Influent Constituent Characteristics of the Modern Waste Stream from Single Sources Influent Constituent Characteristics of the Modern Waste Stream from Single Sources PDF By author Kathryn S. Lowe last download was at 2017-05-14 16:24:14. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Influent Constituent Characteristics of the Modern Waste Stream from Single Sources book. Available as eBook only.


This research project characterized the composition of modern single residential source onsite raw wastewater and primary treated effluent (i.e., septic tank effluent, STE) to aid onsite wastewater system (OWS) design and management. A literature review was conducted to assess the current status of knowledge related to the composition of single source raw wastewater, identify key parameters affecting wastewater composition, and identify information gaps in the current knowledge. This information was supplemented by a field monitoring program to assess the composition of residential OWS raw wastewater and STE.



Field investigations included quarterly monitoring (fall, winter, spring, and summer) at a total of 17 sites from three regions (Colorado, Florida, and Minnesota) within the U.S. to ensure that the results and information gained had broad applicability to the management and design of OWS. A tiered monitoring approach was utilized focusing on conventional constituents, microbial constituents, and organic chemicals. In addition, daily and weekly variability within the raw wastewater and STE were monitored. Information obtained was tabulated and graphically displayed to enable assessment and comparison of parameters that affect single source waste stream composition.



To download workbook data for this report, visit: http://iwapublishing.com/books/9781843393511/influent-constituent-characteristics-modern-waste-stream-single-sources

http://1ym.coincide.us/f4mk1.html pdf
January 23, 1999 683.99 kB Influent Constituent Characteristics of the Modern Waste Stream from Single Sources0    0 2
Strategies for Small Wastewater Systems for Risk Reduction and Safeguarding Assets Strategies for Small Wastewater Systems for Risk Reduction and Safeguarding Assets PDF By author Charles N. Herrick last download was at 2017-11-20 31:49:57. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Strategies for Small Wastewater Systems for Risk Reduction and Safeguarding Assets book. The Gulf Coast hurricanes of 2005 and horrific events of 9/11/2001 have spawned a new emphasis on domestic security and emergency preparedness. Governments at all levels are taking action to reduce their vulnerabilities and prepare for emergencies, including unconventional disasters such as regional-scale weather events and terrorist attacks.


A great deal has been written concerning security practices for large and medium-sized water and wastewater systems. Some of these practices are relevant and applicable to small, rural, and tribal wastewater systems, but many are not. Small systems tend to have characteristics which preclude them from adopting many of the practices employed by larger wastewater and water utilities. This report identifies security-related practices that are applicable for small wastewater systems.



The report adopts a two-pronged approach with respect to security enhancement for small wastewater systems. First, the report focuses on security practices that are consistent with the technical, managerial, and financial capacity of small systems, and identifies a series of security-related "Practice Areas" that can be implemented in the near-term with modest expenditure of financial and/or staff resources. Second, the report outlines a strategy to help small utilities map-out programs for ongoing, sustainable security enhancement. This ongoing strategy is based primarily on the identification of practices and investments that a utility can pursue in cooperation with other municipal and regional entities.

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July 4, 2007 46.16 kB Strategies for Small Wastewater Systems for Risk Reduction and Safeguarding Assets5    0 0
Decentralized Stormwater Controls for Urban Retrofit and Combined Sewer Overflow Reduction, Phase 2 Decentralized Stormwater Controls for Urban Retrofit and Combined Sewer Overflow Reduction, Phase 2 PDF By author Neil Weinstein last download was at 2017-10-19 50:03:19. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Decentralized Stormwater Controls for Urban Retrofit and Combined Sewer Overflow Reduction, Phase 2 book. Phase 1 of this project demonstrated the technical feasibility of using decentralized stormwater controls in urban areas for retrofits and controlling combined sewer overflows. This technical feasibility was illustrated by a number of early adopters using decentralized controls to complement their existing municipal stormwater and wastewater infrastructure. However, institutional and programmatic issues required further study to broaden the use of a distributed, decentralized stormwater approach.


This research evaluates implementation strategies for incorporating decentralized controls into an infrastructure management system. The distributed nature and multiple environmental benefits of decentralized controls necessitate an integrated and inter-departmental management approach. The results of this research identify various implementation strategies for incorporating decentralized controls into urban infrastructure management programs. Case studies and programmatic and regulatory examples detail alternatives to expedite the adoption of decentralized controls. Managing infrastructure by limiting demand is explored in the context of distributed controls. In addition, an evaluation of economic methods appropriate for assessing environmental costs and benefits is included to more fully capture the financial consideration of decentralized controls. Guidance for modeling decentralized controls with commonly used stormwater models is also provided.

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August 30, 2015 700.33 kB Decentralized Stormwater Controls for Urban Retrofit and Combined Sewer Overflow Reduction, Phase 23    0 0
Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Characterization and Bioavailability in Wastewater Effluents Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Characterization and Bioavailability in Wastewater Effluents PDF By author Lauren Hightower last download was at 2018-06-12 14:37:23. This book is good alternative for . Download now for free or you can read online Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Characterization and Bioavailability in Wastewater Effluents book. This project addresses the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) content in the effluents of different wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this report, information is presented on the occurrence and levels of DON in WWTP effluents and its bioavailability. The information presented was generated by a survey of existing data from full scale plants achieving TN removal, direct sampling and monitoring of effluents from selected plants, and laboratory investigations on DON production in biological processes of WWTPs and its bioavailability to algae and bacteria.


The results showed that there is a wide variation in effluent DON at different plants, ranging from non-detectable levels to as high as 2.5 mg N/L. The DON fraction of the effluent TN increases with decrease in effluent TN values, and could be as high as 85% of effluent TN. Size fractionation of effluent organic nitrogen (ON) fraction passing through a 1.2 m filter showed that a significant colloidal fraction of ON exists between 0.1 and 1.2 m particle size range in some plants. A fraction of the effluent DON is readily bioavailable to algae and bacteria in laboratory bioassays, and the presence of both algae and bacteria species in the bioassay increases the bioavailable DON fraction.

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March 26, 2009 243.23 kB Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Characterization and Bioavailability in Wastewater Effluents3    0 0